The face of black maternal health

October is Black Maternal Health Month in Nebraska

Respect Our Womb - Nebraska Black Maternal Health Month
Nebraska ranks 19th in Maternal Mortality rates and it is imperative for the health care systems to address why Black mamas and birthing folks are dying during and after birth. October is an intentional time to deep dive into solutions, interventions and opportunities to change the outcomes for Black women & birthing folks.

I Be Black Girl is excited to host workshops, learnings and experiences all month long that support medical practitioners and Black birthing folks in the birthing process.

Live Events

Our Truth: Stories of the Black Birthing Experience

October 7, 7:00 – 8:00 pm
Register Here

Systemic Racism and Impacts on Maternal Health Part I
October 12, 12:00 - 12:45 pm
Register Here

More than Numbers: Improving Access to Maternal Health Data
October 19, 12:00 – 1:00 pm
Register Here

Power and Choice in the Birthing Process

October 28, 7:00 – 8:00 pm
Register Here

On Demand Sessions

Systemic Racism and Impacts on Maternal Health Part II

Economic Liberation is Black Maternal Health

Advocating for Black Maternal Health

Titty Talk: Breastfeeding for Black Mamas

The Face of Black Maternal Health in Nebraska

Medical Bondage: A Conversation with Dr. Cooper Owens

The Face of Black Maternal Health in Nebraska

I Be Black Girl works with various partners across Nebraska to address the inequities, trauma and violence within the maternal health sector. Our goal is to Expand Access to Quality & Culturally Relevant Maternal Health Services.  Black women & birthing folks in the United States experience unacceptably poor maternal health outcomes, including disproportionately high rates of death related to pregnancy or childbirth.

More likely to be uninsured

Face greater financial barriers to care when we need it

Less likely to access prenatal care

Experiencing higher rates of many preventable diseases and chronic health conditions

When, or if, Black women/folks choose to become pregnant, these health conditions influence both maternal and infant health outcomes.

  • Black women/folks experience “weathering,” meaning our bodies experience physical harm due to exposure to chronic stress linked to socioeconomic inequities, discrimination and racism over the life span, making pregnancy riskier at an earlier age
  • Black  women are 3-4X more likely to die during or after delivery than are white women
  • The top leading causes of death for Black women/folks when pregnant or giving birth are “other” heart conditions and blood clots, all preventable causes

How Do We Move Forward?

To improve Black women’s maternal health, we need a comprehensive approach that addresses our health across the lifespan; improves access to and the delivery of quality care; and provides greater economic security and advocacy at the policy and system level.

  • Expand access to culturally relevant and trusted providers, community based care and various kinds of birth workers
  • Expand paid family and medical leave
  • Expand access to quality, patient-centered comprehensive reproductive and obstetric health care
  • Expand protections for pregnant workers
  • Address the pay inequity for Black women and femmes in the workforce
  • Collect and disaggregate maternal health, mortality, and morbidity data by race and gender

We Need Nebraska Policymakers & Medical Professionals to:

  • Expand access to culturally relevant and trusted providers, community based care and various kinds of birth workers
  • Expand paid family and medical leave
  • Expand access to quality, patient-centered comprehensive reproductive and obstetric health care
  • Expand protections for pregnant workers
  • Address the pay inequity for Black women and femmes in the workforce
  • Collect and disaggregate maternal health, mortality, and morbidity data by race and gender
Black women younger than 30 are 2-3X more likely to die from pregnancy related causes than white women. For Black women over 30 years old, this figure increases to 4-5X higher than white women.
The top leading causes of death for Black women/folks when pregnant or giving birth are “other” heart conditions and blood clots, all preventable causes.
use your voice

Share your story and experience with us in order to achieve quality and culturally relevant maternal health services that center Black women, femmes, girls and folks with uteri.

In 2018, Black women had the second highest rate of preterm birth, with 12.8% of births being preterm. White women had preterm birth rate of 9.8%. 

language definitions

Severe maternal morbidity (SMM) includes unexpected outcomes of labor and delivery that result in significant short- or long-term consequences to a woman’s health

Maternal health refers to the health of [Black] women or folks with reproductive systems during pregnancy, childbirth and the postnatal period.

Obstetric relates to childbirth and any processes associated with it.

Mortality rate is the number of deaths in a given area or period, or from a particular cause.

other resources

Black Maternal Health in the U.S.

Policy

Organizations

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